<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 at 22:56, Ville Voutilainen <<a href="mailto:ville.voutilainen@gmail.com">ville.voutilainen@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 at 23:43, Benjamin TERRIER <<a href="mailto:b.terrier@gmail.com" target="_blank">b.terrier@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
>> I know, but since there's no free right to download binaries, GDPR<br>
>> doesn't prevent getting explicit consent before allowing<br>
>> a download. Would you like me to give people more ideas? :)<br>
> GDPR states that data collection shall be "limited to what is necessary".<br>
> Requiring explicit consent for the user to provide data is not enough to be GDPR compliant.<br>
> The required data has to be "necessary".<br>
<br>
That is one of six lawful bases for processing data. There are five<br>
others. GDPR doesn't require all six<br>
to apply, it requires at least one.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I believe you are talking about article 6, I am talking about article 5 which does not have this "at least one" clause.<br></div></div></div>