<div dir="ltr"><div>I am not a lawyer too, but in this case, if I download Qt for personal reasons (hobby projects) I act as a natural person, and The Qt Company gathers my email address, and this is personal information. Of course, I consent to this specifically but the thing is, I have to consent because The Qt Company forces me to. Otherwise, I can't download the binaries. And I don't see how the need of gathering my email address as a natural person is sufficiently explained to me. <br></div><div><br></div><div>Cheers</div><div>Dmitriy<br></div><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Mon, Jan 27, 2020 at 10:07 PM Ville Voutilainen <<a href="mailto:ville.voutilainen@gmail.com" target="_blank">ville.voutilainen@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 at 21:56, Dmitriy Purgin <<a href="mailto:dpurgin@gmail.com" target="_blank">dpurgin@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
><br>
> By the way, gathering emails by requiring an account to download the software without any technical reason might be indeed an example of a GDPR violation.<br>
<br>
I am not a lawyer, but I am unaware of any free software license that<br>
gives you a right to download binaries at the terms<br>
of your own choosing. Source downloads are a different matter.<br>
</blockquote></div>