<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    So one follow up question:<br>
    I already have a few machines that have PySide2 installed (I did
    this before the wheel in question disappeared on me).<br>
    Is there a sane way to rip an existing install from one machine to
    put it on another?<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 05/21/2019 02:28 PM, Bob Hood wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:59147331-16b7-bda1-3d62-df3d89d71d14@comcast.net">
      <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
      <tt>On 5/20/2019 4:49 PM, Frank Rueter | OHUfx wrote:</tt><tt><br>
      </tt>
      <blockquote type="cite"
        cite="mid:5d6a93fd-6b0d-89a6-de4e-999af77a51f9@ohufx.com"><tt>I
          know that, the problem is I work in an industry that has been
          clinging onto Python 2.7 with al their major softwares for way
          too long, it has not been my choice. </tt><tt><br>
        </tt></blockquote>
      <tt><br>
      </tt><tt>As do I, and as do many others.  Python 2.7.x is not
        simply going to disappear with a *POOF* on 1 January.  I
        personally never get any reports from customers regarding bugs
        in Python 2.7.x; I update to the latest patch release simply out
        of reflex and courtesy.</tt><tt><br>
      </tt><tt><br>
      </tt><tt><tt>Since the Python team is planning the last patch
          release (2.7.18) <i>on</i> 1 January, this version will be
          around for some time to come, at least a year from now, if not
          more.  Yes, we should be herding our customers into the Python
          3 corral, however, due to the massive number of assets
          customers have that represents thousands of man-hours of work,
          there is a need to support Python v2.7.x through the remainder
          of its life, and start conditioning those customers to the
          finality of it in the (somewhat near) future.<br>
          <br>
          Now, as for PySide2, somebody may have already pointed this
          out, but they are not supporting Windows/Python 2.7.x because
          that version of Python is being built (the interpreter build
          distributed by Python.org, that is) using Visual Studio 2008. 
          This is incompatible with Qt v5.12.x.  However, Python 2.7.x
          can be built using VS2017--I do it myself with each patch
          update I provided to my customers--which means, if you <i>really</i>
          want to use PySide2 with Python 2.7.x under Windows, you can
          go to the effort of building all of them yourself with the
          same toolchain, and it will work.  It's just that the
          Python.org team won't update from Visual Studio 2008 so close
          to EOL, and the Qt Company won't (and probably can't in the
          first place) patch Qt 5.12.x to work with Visual Studio 2008. 
          The two will never meet.<br>
        </tt></tt> </blockquote>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-signature">-- <br>
      <table style="width: 524px; height: 58px;" border="0">
        <tbody>
          <tr>
            <td style="text-align: center;"><a
                href="http://www.ohufx.com"><img
                  src="http://ohufx.com/images/ohufxLogo_50x50.png"
                  alt="ohufxLogo 50x50"></a></td>
            <td style="text-align: center;"><strong><span
                  style="font-size: 10pt;"><a
                    href="http://ohufx.com/index.php/vfx-compositing">vfx
                    compositing</a></span> | <span style="font-size:
                  10pt;"><strong><a
                      href="http://ohufx.com/index.php/vfx-customising">workflow
                      customisation and consulting</a></strong> </span>
              </strong></td>
          </tr>
        </tbody>
      </table>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>