<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    I do understand, but a few months ago we were able to run this to
    install a PySide2 version that works just fine:<br>
    <pre style="font-family: monospace, Courier; padding: 1em; border: 1px solid rgb(221, 221, 221); color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: rgb(249, 249, 249); line-height: 1.3em; font-size: 12.8px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">pip install --index-url=<a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" class="external free" href="http://download.qt.io/snapshots/ci/pyside/5.6/latest/" style="text-decoration: none; color: rgb(102, 51, 102); background: url("data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAoAAAAKCAYAAACNMs+9AAAAVElEQVR42n3PgQkAIAhEUXdqJ3dqJ3e6IoTPUSQcgj4EQ5IlUiLE0Jil3PECXhcHGBhZ8kg4hwxAu3MZeCGeyFnAXp4hqNQPnt7QL0nADpD6wHccLvnAKksq8iiaAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC") right center no-repeat; padding-right: 13px;">http://download.qt.io/snapshots/ci/pyside/5.6/latest/</a> pyside2 --trusted-host download.qt.io
</pre>
    We only need this for a single inhouse app we use every day and it
    has worked perfectly on the three machines it was installed on.<br>
    <br>
    Now we need it on more machines and the above no longer works.<br>
    I didn't want to get into any more complicated issues.<br>
    <br>
    I understand for serious development this is very important, but for
    us it's a single, simple but important tool we can't use easily
    (except on three machines) and I would love to rectify this until I
    get time to adapt the code for python3.<br>
    <br>
    So if anybody has an idea where to find the installer that would
    have been pulled via the above earlier this year I would very much
    appreciate it.<br>
    <br>
    Cheers,<br>
    frank<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 22/05/19 2:53 AM, Cristián
      Maureira-Fredes wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
      cite="mid:0782d3c2-cc96-b52a-38d7-a6b5d947f228@qt.io">
      <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">Hello,

Just wanted to point out that when you go to:

<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://pyside.org">https://pyside.org</a>

you see a colorful table with the
compatibility on the different platform and the reason
behind them being not supported.

I was under the impression that it was the best
way possible to communicate these release of the
details, but I think I was mistaken.

Since I don't want this to be a RTFM email,
I'm honestly asking:

Does anyone has any other more direct way to communicate this?

Maybe people were confused while visiting:

<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://www.qt.io/qt-for-python">https://www.qt.io/qt-for-python</a>

Should we mention the support there too?

I really would like to know how to communicate this,
since it's possible that in an unknown period of time
we will drop support for Python2 (months? years?)
and then we will need to communicate that with the whole
community.

Cheers


On 5/18/19 8:06 PM, Croitor Alexandru wrote:
</pre>
      <blockquote type="cite">
        <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">Hi,

Point 1: At the official first release of Qt For Python / PySide2 which 
was bundled with Qt 5.11, we never provided py27 windows packages. So 
officially, we haven't dropped any packages, because they weren't there 
in the first place.

Point 2: Packages for py2.7 for PySide2 do not exist not because of py2 
EoL, but rather because the official py27 interpreter is built with MSVC 
2008, whereas Qt is built with MSVC2015, and we deemed that with the 
current PySide2 codebase, it is not safe to mix MSVC runtimes.

This was communicated multiple times, and is mentioned on the wiki as 
well. Yet people still insist on bringing it up, disregarding that such 
packages are not safe to use.

People are free to try and build Py2.7 + Qt + PySide2 with the same MSVC 
version, and use that.

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 7:03 PM Thiago Macieira 
<<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:thiago.macieira@intel.com">thiago.macieira@intel.com</a> <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:thiago.macieira@intel.com"><mailto:thiago.macieira@intel.com></a>> wrote:

    On Friday, 17 May 2019 18:26:11 PDT Bob Hood wrote:
     > On 5/17/2019 2:58 PM, Thiago Macieira wrote:
     > > On Friday, 17 May 2019 10:16:04 PDT Bob Hood wrote:
     > >> They have (prematurely, imo) abandoned the combination of
    Windows +
     > >> Python
     > >> v2.7.  You will only be able to install PySide2 under Windows
    with Python
     > >> v3.x now.
     > >
     > > Less than 7 and a half months of support for Python 2 left,
    until it EOLs,
     > > after a 5 year extension. Everyone has migrated their business
    critical
     > > applications to Python 3 by now, right?
     >
     > Well, to me "7 and a half months...left" is not EOL, and I don't know
     > precisely when Python v2/Windows support was jettisoned, but you
    can add
     > that difference to the duration as well.That's how I personally
    define
     > "prematurely."

    Python2 support was deprecated by the Python community and the
    Python Software
    Foundation many years ago. Its EOL was pushed from Jan 1, 2015 to
    Jan 1, 2020.

    The point is not about Pyside, it's about *Python*. People have had
    over 10
    years to switch from 2.x to 3. With less than 7½ months left, I'm sure
    everyone with critical applications have already switch, right?

    <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://pythonclock.org/">https://pythonclock.org/</a>

     > But the decision is made; I'm not instigating a brush war over
    it.  I'm not
     > invested in PySide2, and neither are my customers. It was just
    going to be a
     > convenience for them as long as we continued to support Python
    v2.  Now it
     > won't.

    I think the point is that it's not worth the resources required to
    build and
    test the Python2 bulld when so few are (supposed to be) still using it.

    -- 
    Thiago Macieira - thiago.macieira (AT) intel.com <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="http://intel.com"><http://intel.com></a>
       Software Architect - Intel System Software Products



    _______________________________________________
    Interest mailing list
    <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Interest@qt-project.org">Interest@qt-project.org</a> <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:Interest@qt-project.org"><mailto:Interest@qt-project.org></a>
    <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://lists.qt-project.org/listinfo/interest">https://lists.qt-project.org/listinfo/interest</a>


_______________________________________________
Interest mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Interest@qt-project.org">Interest@qt-project.org</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://lists.qt-project.org/listinfo/interest">https://lists.qt-project.org/listinfo/interest</a>

</pre>
      </blockquote>
      <pre class="moz-quote-pre" wrap="">
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>